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OddCon It Is

Just a reminder that I’ll be at OddCon for a short while this weekend. I’m scheduled for a seminar on Saturday at 2:30 PM. It’s called “Game Fiction,” and it features Monica Valentinelli, Matt McElroy, Pat Rothfuss, and me.

I’ll likely have to take off in the early evening to get back home, so it’ll be a short trip for me. If you’re going to be at the show, be sure to track me down and say hi!

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  1. Matt, if you’ll be talking about how to break into the market on game fiction, will you post some info here?

    1. I’m sure that will come up, but I don’t have any notes to work from. I’ll be speaking off the top of my head. If you have specific questions, let me know, and I can post answers here.

  2. Matt, if you’ll be talking about how to break into the market on game fiction, will you post some info here?

    1. Post
      Author

      I’m sure that will come up, but I don’t have any notes to work from. I’ll be speaking off the top of my head. If you have specific questions, let me know, and I can post answers here.

  3. The market isn’t any more stable than anything else these days, which is to say, it’s not. However, it’s not any worse either.

    To break in, you need to write a novel. Try one of your own first. Don’t write a tie-in novel without a license, as you’ll likely just be wasting your time.

    Before an editor commissions a novel from you, she’ll want some confirmation that you can actually complete a novel. Your original novel serves as proof of that, and there’s always the possibility that you can sell that elsewhere too. Once you have that sample, it’s easier to start knocking down doors, but without it you likely won’t go far.

    That’s the short answer, and only the first step, of course.

  4. Post
    Author

    The market isn’t any more stable than anything else these days, which is to say, it’s not. However, it’s not any worse either.

    To break in, you need to write a novel. Try one of your own first. Don’t write a tie-in novel without a license, as you’ll likely just be wasting your time.

    Before an editor commissions a novel from you, she’ll want some confirmation that you can actually complete a novel. Your original novel serves as proof of that, and there’s always the possibility that you can sell that elsewhere too. Once you have that sample, it’s easier to start knocking down doors, but without it you likely won’t go far.

    That’s the short answer, and only the first step, of course.

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