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Champions MMO

My friends at Cryptic Studios just announced the Champions MMO, as well as the fact they’ve purchased the property and licensed it back to previous owner Hero Games so they can keep making the tabletop RPG.

Jack Emmert, who’s in charge of Cryptic, has loved superhero RPGs forever. I remember chatting with him about my Brave New World RPG before it even hit shelves, and he just glowed with the superhero love.

I’m thrilled for Steve, Darren, and Tina at Hero, especially Steve, who broke into RPG writing many years ago with Dark Champions. This should be a good shot in the arm for them, and I’m looking forward to many more great things from them.

Many years ago, the original Hero Games crew set itself off on a course to create a Champions computer game. They even asked me to write some of the adventures for it once it got off the ground. Sadly that day never came.

Ray Greer, one of those original Heroes, had vowed not to shave his beard or cut his hair until the game shipped. He looked awful shaggy for a long time. I knew for sure the project was dead when I finally saw him looking trimmed again.

Now, though, it looks like it’s going to happen and be better than ever. This is a great teaming of creators and concept, and I’ll be first in line to play.

Comments 8

  1. I remember, years back, seeing a demo of that early Champions computer game at DundraCon. They had the character design down, which eventually became the basis for their character creation program, and the graphics looked like a nice adaptation of a comic book.

    But I couldn’t help thinking as Ray was describing the game, that they were trying to make a 2001 video game in 1994. They were very ambitious in how open ended they wanted things to be. I both admired them and worried that I would never be able to put the smack down on Mechanon. Now I might just get my chance.

    Given that Cryptic is doing the project, I wonder if this will replace CoH. As much as I liked that game, I think a Champions version –with Champions mechanics — would be enough to bring me back. Well…unless it is based on what I call a “fifth edition mentality” where you need to purchase the number of atoms in your superhero costume.

    I have mixed feelings about Steve Long. First, I am amazed. Both for his obvious love of Champions and for his awesome ability to write prolific rulebooks. But then there’s the part of me that loved the first Dark Champions rulebook, which shifted the way I thought about the Hero “toolkit,” but also introduced a long series of Dark Champions follow ups that I believe were a part of the downfall of 4th edition’s sales.

    In all honesty, fourth edition is my favorite edition. The stat blocks were robust, but not intimidating and the players tended to allow for broader interpretations of effects for powers than the post 5th edition crowd.

    Not that any of this will stop me from buying the eagerly awaited, by me as well, 6th edition of Hero. And D&D players complain about 4th edition.

  2. I remember, years back, seeing a demo of that early Champions computer game at DundraCon. They had the character design down, which eventually became the basis for their character creation program, and the graphics looked like a nice adaptation of a comic book.

    But I couldn’t help thinking as Ray was describing the game, that they were trying to make a 2001 video game in 1994. They were very ambitious in how open ended they wanted things to be. I both admired them and worried that I would never be able to put the smack down on Mechanon. Now I might just get my chance.

    Given that Cryptic is doing the project, I wonder if this will replace CoH. As much as I liked that game, I think a Champions version –with Champions mechanics — would be enough to bring me back. Well…unless it is based on what I call a “fifth edition mentality” where you need to purchase the number of atoms in your superhero costume.

    I have mixed feelings about Steve Long. First, I am amazed. Both for his obvious love of Champions and for his awesome ability to write prolific rulebooks. But then there’s the part of me that loved the first Dark Champions rulebook, which shifted the way I thought about the Hero “toolkit,” but also introduced a long series of Dark Champions follow ups that I believe were a part of the downfall of 4th edition’s sales.

    In all honesty, fourth edition is my favorite edition. The stat blocks were robust, but not intimidating and the players tended to allow for broader interpretations of effects for powers than the post 5th edition crowd.

    Not that any of this will stop me from buying the eagerly awaited, by me as well, 6th edition of Hero. And D&D players complain about 4th edition.

  3. The newest issue of Game Informer has a good 6 page article about the game. Great screenshots and some nice new features not seen in the predecessor CoH.

    Look for me in some form of superhero when it hits the shelves.

    Hmm…wonder if I could get away with Patriot? πŸ™‚

  4. The newest issue of Game Informer has a good 6 page article about the game. Great screenshots and some nice new features not seen in the predecessor CoH.

    Look for me in some form of superhero when it hits the shelves.

    Hmm…wonder if I could get away with Patriot? πŸ™‚

  5. Christian: I believe that Cryptic sold City of Heroes/Villains to NCSoft, which gives Cryptic no good reason to not try to replace that game. As for Steve, he’s a great designer, and his love for Champions is unparalleled. One of the surprising parts of the deal is that he parted with the game, but since he gets to keep doing the RPG, I suppose it works our well for him anyhow.

    Brian: You’ll have to beat me to it. πŸ™‚

  6. Post
    Author

    Christian: I believe that Cryptic sold City of Heroes/Villains to NCSoft, which gives Cryptic no good reason to not try to replace that game. As for Steve, he’s a great designer, and his love for Champions is unparalleled. One of the surprising parts of the deal is that he parted with the game, but since he gets to keep doing the RPG, I suppose it works our well for him anyhow.

    Brian: You’ll have to beat me to it. πŸ™‚

  7. I’m REALLY excited to see this game. I’ve been playing the table-top game since the ’80s. I was dissappointed in the rigidness of the City of Heroes character creation system. There were lots of character combination options, but many of them were redundant and unoriginal, and even goofy at times. I’ll be very interested in playing a game that really lets you build your powers from the ground up, the way YOU want to see them.

  8. I’m REALLY excited to see this game. I’ve been playing the table-top game since the ’80s. I was dissappointed in the rigidness of the City of Heroes character creation system. There were lots of character combination options, but many of them were redundant and unoriginal, and even goofy at times. I’ll be very interested in playing a game that really lets you build your powers from the ground up, the way YOU want to see them.

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