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Open Call at Wizards

Wizards of the Coast just started its annual open call for fiction submissions for its upcoming speculative fiction imprint. You have until January 1, but if you have a manuscript that would fit, I suggest getting on it sooner than later. If they accept your submission, which includes the first three chapters of your book, they’ll want the whole thing within ten business days. Unless you can write that fast, stick with works you’ve already completed instead. Good luck!

Comments 8

  1. Wow, I just read the standard submission waiver, and its brutally one-sided. It’s a license for WotC to do as they please with anything anyone submits.

    Thanks but no thanks.

  2. Wow, I just read the standard submission waiver, and its brutally one-sided. It’s a license for WotC to do as they please with anything anyone submits.

    Thanks but no thanks.

  3. This is a standard submission waiver that most game publishers use. I didn’t find it all that onerous. Essentially it protects Wizards from lawsuits arising from parallel development.

    On the other hand, as one of their authors I’d approach my editors directly rather than taking this route.

  4. Post
    Author

    This is a standard submission waiver that most game publishers use. I didn’t find it all that onerous. Essentially it protects Wizards from lawsuits arising from parallel development.

    On the other hand, as one of their authors I’d approach my editors directly rather than taking this route.

  5. Yeah, I get this sort of waiver for game material all the time. But I have a novel sitting with a book publisher in NY who doesn’t ask for this sort of waiver, or any waiver at all.

    Why are they applying the standards of the game industry to a novel submission? It just seems like an attempt to drive away authors who have some experience with the regular publishing world.

  6. Yeah, I get this sort of waiver for game material all the time. But I have a novel sitting with a book publisher in NY who doesn’t ask for this sort of waiver, or any waiver at all.

    Why are they applying the standards of the game industry to a novel submission? It just seems like an attempt to drive away authors who have some experience with the regular publishing world.

  7. I wouldn’t call it a purposeful attempt on behalf of the book department to alienate established authors. It’s more like a carryover from the larger corporate culture that understands games and toys far better than independent fiction. Like you’ve I’ve signed waivers like these before, and I wouldn’t blink at doing so again—with a company, like Wizards, that I trust.

    In most cases, it’s far more trouble for a company to steal something than it is to just buy it. I’ve only known one such case in the gaming industry, which involved the wrestling CCGs from Comic Images and Wizards, and it ended well for the designer.

  8. Post
    Author

    I wouldn’t call it a purposeful attempt on behalf of the book department to alienate established authors. It’s more like a carryover from the larger corporate culture that understands games and toys far better than independent fiction. Like you’ve I’ve signed waivers like these before, and I wouldn’t blink at doing so again—with a company, like Wizards, that I trust.

    In most cases, it’s far more trouble for a company to steal something than it is to just buy it. I’ve only known one such case in the gaming industry, which involved the wrestling CCGs from Comic Images and Wizards, and it ended well for the designer.

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