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Diana Jones Award Party

Speaking of Gen Con, if you’re an industry professional and have yet to receive a notice about the Diana Jones Award ceremony at Gen Con, drop me an e-mail for the details. For the moment, just reserve some time late on Wednesday, August 9, to join your compadres in celebrating some of the best games of the year.

Comments 8

  1. Before I sound like I am coming off as snarky, let me say that I think that the Diana Jones Award is a very good idea. I think we need more awards given out by industry professionals. There is a reason, or at least there is supposed to be, that there are the Oscars and the People’s Choice Awards. One is supposed to be merit and the other popularity.

    This, and what I will be snarky about, are stated as goals of the Diana Jones Award on the website you link. “The Diana Jones Award is decided on merit, not popularity or commercial success.” When you add to that the secrecy/selection criteria of the committee “It is up to each member of the judging committee to decide whether they will reveal their membership, but the full membership list will not be made public. Most of the members of the Diana Jones judging committee are anonymous, but Peter Adkison, Matt Forbeck, John Kovalic and James Wallis have all revealed their membership.” It can lead one to wonder just how pretentious/snobby/undemocratic the group is.

    That is until you read a description of the physical Award itself. “The trophy is a four-sided pyramid made of Perspex, standing ten centimetres high and mounted on a wooden base. Sealed within the Perspex are the burnt remains of the last copy of the Indiana Jones RPG, including two still-recognizable cardboard ‘Nazi™’ figures, as recorded in gaming folklore.” Comic Gold. Very funny indeed.

    I only have one critique. I own a copy of the Indiana Jones Roleplaying Game, I have run sessions of the Indiana Jones Roleplaying Game, and of the nominees none are an Indiana Jones Roleplaying Game.

  2. Before I sound like I am coming off as snarky, let me say that I think that the Diana Jones Award is a very good idea. I think we need more awards given out by industry professionals. There is a reason, or at least there is supposed to be, that there are the Oscars and the People’s Choice Awards. One is supposed to be merit and the other popularity.

    This, and what I will be snarky about, are stated as goals of the Diana Jones Award on the website you link. “The Diana Jones Award is decided on merit, not popularity or commercial success.” When you add to that the secrecy/selection criteria of the committee “It is up to each member of the judging committee to decide whether they will reveal their membership, but the full membership list will not be made public. Most of the members of the Diana Jones judging committee are anonymous, but Peter Adkison, Matt Forbeck, John Kovalic and James Wallis have all revealed their membership.” It can lead one to wonder just how pretentious/snobby/undemocratic the group is.

    That is until you read a description of the physical Award itself. “The trophy is a four-sided pyramid made of Perspex, standing ten centimetres high and mounted on a wooden base. Sealed within the Perspex are the burnt remains of the last copy of the Indiana Jones RPG, including two still-recognizable cardboard ‘Nazi™’ figures, as recorded in gaming folklore.” Comic Gold. Very funny indeed.

    I only have one critique. I own a copy of the Indiana Jones Roleplaying Game, I have run sessions of the Indiana Jones Roleplaying Game, and of the nominees none are an Indiana Jones Roleplaying Game.

  3. Christian, I understand your concerns about the DJA committee’s secrecy, but here’s the rub: as a whole, we don’t much care if anyone pays attention to the awards. They’re mostly an excuse for a group of professionals to chat about the best games of the year and then have a party at Gen Con. We try not to take ourselves or the award too seriously, although we do put a great number of keystrokes into discussing it.

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    Author

    Christian, I understand your concerns about the DJA committee’s secrecy, but here’s the rub: as a whole, we don’t much care if anyone pays attention to the awards. They’re mostly an excuse for a group of professionals to chat about the best games of the year and then have a party at Gen Con. We try not to take ourselves or the award too seriously, although we do put a great number of keystrokes into discussing it.

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    Author

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