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Dark Side, Here I Come

Today I bought the first Windows machine I’ve ever owned. I’ve used Windows machines a lot. At Human Head, I had a Windows laptop, and at Pinnacle, we had a dozen or so Windows computers, so technically I owned part of those.

This one, though, is the first that I’ve paid money for and brought into my house. Don’t get me wrong. I love my iBook, and I’m not giving it up.

This new machine, though, is for games. This is the one area in which the Mac lags. There are games for the Mac, but most of them are just ports of the Windows versions that come out months if not years after the original.

This is especially true for kids’ educational games. There are some older ones available for OS 9, but the latest Macs can’t run these at all.

So, Windows it is. Now, I just have to get my hands on some of those games.

Comments 8

  1. Ironically, I look at Apple as the “Dark Side.” Their products have a sleaker look, their practices are more proprietary, and the internal “teams” have often been pitted against one another.

    God help those, who in the 80s, weren’t on the Macintosh team.

    PC’s on the other hand are held together, loosely, by an operating system (if they choose it). They are often collections of parts from different eras. The companies who make games for them are a rag tag army.

    That doesn’t mean that Microsoft is the rebels or anything, I look at them as Correllian Corp who provides stuff for the rebels. Walk into a store selling PCs and their are many manufacturers, even for the basic processor.

    Walk into an Apple store…you are walking into an Empire.

  2. Ironically, I look at Apple as the “Dark Side.” Their products have a sleaker look, their practices are more proprietary, and the internal “teams” have often been pitted against one another.

    God help those, who in the 80s, weren’t on the Macintosh team.

    PC’s on the other hand are held together, loosely, by an operating system (if they choose it). They are often collections of parts from different eras. The companies who make games for them are a rag tag army.

    That doesn’t mean that Microsoft is the rebels or anything, I look at them as Correllian Corp who provides stuff for the rebels. Walk into a store selling PCs and their are many manufacturers, even for the basic processor.

    Walk into an Apple store…you are walking into an Empire.

  3. How cool is it that Bruce Harlick reads your blog?

    Now if only we could get him to run a Champions game…old school…none of this 5th edition revised stuff. Why these young whippersnappers today…they don’t know what it was like when Marksman and Foxbat were bringing smiles to young children’s faces.

  4. How cool is it that Bruce Harlick reads your blog?

    Now if only we could get him to run a Champions game…old school…none of this 5th edition revised stuff. Why these young whippersnappers today…they don’t know what it was like when Marksman and Foxbat were bringing smiles to young children’s faces.

  5. Thanks, Bruce! You’re a pal! What I really want is that Indy game you’re working on, but I’ll just have to be patient.

    Christian, I’ve known Bruce since the early ’90s when we both used to work the ICE booth at Gen Con every year. We both loved the Hero System, as you can tell by the fact I wrote Western Hero and Bruce went on to become the system’s developer for a while.

    As for PCs/Macs, I think of Windows as the Dark Side because it seduces Mac users (like me) with its games and such, pulling them from the path of righteousness. But that’s just a silly metaphor. Honestly, both systems are solid these days. I prefer the Mac’s sense of design and comparatively well-unified interface, but I’m happy to have my new Windows machine on its way too.

    I thought about running Windows on a new Mac using Boot Camp, but it seemed like a lot of extra money. Macs cost more to begin with, and if you toss the cost of a copy of Windows on top of that, it’s less attractive. Since I already have an iBook on which I work, I thought it would be great to have a true Windows machine around that I could use for games and for the odd projects I have that require them.

    On the REVs project, for instance, I produced a CD-ROM that works on OS X and Windows XP. To test it out, I had to run over to my mother’s house and use her computer. This will make things much easier.

  6. Post
    Author

    Thanks, Bruce! You’re a pal! What I really want is that Indy game you’re working on, but I’ll just have to be patient.

    Christian, I’ve known Bruce since the early ’90s when we both used to work the ICE booth at Gen Con every year. We both loved the Hero System, as you can tell by the fact I wrote Western Hero and Bruce went on to become the system’s developer for a while.

    As for PCs/Macs, I think of Windows as the Dark Side because it seduces Mac users (like me) with its games and such, pulling them from the path of righteousness. But that’s just a silly metaphor. Honestly, both systems are solid these days. I prefer the Mac’s sense of design and comparatively well-unified interface, but I’m happy to have my new Windows machine on its way too.

    I thought about running Windows on a new Mac using Boot Camp, but it seemed like a lot of extra money. Macs cost more to begin with, and if you toss the cost of a copy of Windows on top of that, it’s less attractive. Since I already have an iBook on which I work, I thought it would be great to have a true Windows machine around that I could use for games and for the odd projects I have that require them.

    On the REVs project, for instance, I produced a CD-ROM that works on OS X and Windows XP. To test it out, I had to run over to my mother’s house and use her computer. This will make things much easier.

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