10

Beloit Cops Rock

I get a phone call at 3 AM on Saturday, and the first thing I think is that it must be something horrible—or a wrong number. No one calls with good news or to say hi at 3 AM, so I’m really hoping for a wrong number when I pick up the phone.

“Hello?”

“Mr. Forbeck?” Ouch. No wrong number here.

“Yes?”

“This is the Beloit Police Department.” Oh, dear.

I’m home. My kids are home. Has someone I know died, or do I have to go bail someone out?

“Yes?”

“The dome light in your car is on. We wouldn’t want your battery to run down.”

I pull back the curtain and peer out the window. Sure enough, there’s a squad car sitting behind my car, in which the dome light is on. (I think one of the quads turned it on while messing around in the car on Friday morning, and I never saw it.)

“Um, thanks. I’ll be right down to turn it off.”

By the time I get outside, the cops are gone, disappeared into the night without sticking around for my personal thanks, just like the heroes they are. But my battery—and by extension, my upcoming morning—is saved.

Comments 10

  1. That’s the kind of small town service one gets in, well, a small town – not that Beloit is that small, but you know what I mean, I think. I had my license plates stolen where I live six months ago, and I had to fill out all the paperwork myself, including doing (more or less) a self-interview. Mind you, a stolen license plate isn’t a capital offense, but neither is a dome light being left on. 🙂

    Still, it’s one of those stories that makes you feel good about the place where you live. Enjoy the feeling! Always nice to know that A) someone is paying attention, and B) someone is looking out for YOU.

    Eagerly awaiting Death Match!

    Bill

  2. That’s the kind of small town service one gets in, well, a small town – not that Beloit is that small, but you know what I mean, I think. I had my license plates stolen where I live six months ago, and I had to fill out all the paperwork myself, including doing (more or less) a self-interview. Mind you, a stolen license plate isn’t a capital offense, but neither is a dome light being left on. 🙂

    Still, it’s one of those stories that makes you feel good about the place where you live. Enjoy the feeling! Always nice to know that A) someone is paying attention, and B) someone is looking out for YOU.

    Eagerly awaiting Death Match!

    Bill

  3. In a small way, I imagine that the ability to help a citizen in a small way was deeply appreciated by the police themselves. In other words, maybe being able to do the deed was thanks enough.

    The reason I say this is that police usually deal with the worst in society. They respond to murder, theft, assault. Lord only knows how many “domestic disturbances” any given police officer responds to on a daily basis. To be able to call a citizen, a peaceful and law-abiding one, and aid them, is in many ways a blessing. Imagine how nice it would be to here a pleasant voice say, “Um, thanks. I’ll be right down to turn it off,” instead of the invective they here on an almost continual basis.

  4. In a small way, I imagine that the ability to help a citizen in a small way was deeply appreciated by the police themselves. In other words, maybe being able to do the deed was thanks enough.

    The reason I say this is that police usually deal with the worst in society. They respond to murder, theft, assault. Lord only knows how many “domestic disturbances” any given police officer responds to on a daily basis. To be able to call a citizen, a peaceful and law-abiding one, and aid them, is in many ways a blessing. Imagine how nice it would be to here a pleasant voice say, “Um, thanks. I’ll be right down to turn it off,” instead of the invective they here on an almost continual basis.

  5. Good point. The cops I’ve known have almost all been great people, but the job tends to take a toll on them. One of my partners at Pinnacle worked the child abuse beat in a little city in the worst part of LA. I went on a ridealong with him once, and it stunned me to see what he had to deal with—and this was on an easy night.

  6. Post
    Author

    Good point. The cops I’ve known have almost all been great people, but the job tends to take a toll on them. One of my partners at Pinnacle worked the child abuse beat in a little city in the worst part of LA. I went on a ridealong with him once, and it stunned me to see what he had to deal with—and this was on an easy night.

  7. i’m glad to hear that there are police out there who are helping people.
    i’m not trying to infer that the cops around here are hurting people, but i ask you this:

    is a pregnant woman driving to work at 6am on a highway going the standard speed (IE 75 in a 65) more dangerous than a drunk leaving a bar on a friday or saturday night?

    i have never complained about a ticket, but i do complain when i know that there are problems out there that are not the priority of the Massachusetts state troopers.

  8. i’m glad to hear that there are police out there who are helping people.
    i’m not trying to infer that the cops around here are hurting people, but i ask you this:

    is a pregnant woman driving to work at 6am on a highway going the standard speed (IE 75 in a 65) more dangerous than a drunk leaving a bar on a friday or saturday night?

    i have never complained about a ticket, but i do complain when i know that there are problems out there that are not the priority of the Massachusetts state troopers.

  9. I understand how you feel about those kinds of hassles, Barak. I’d tell the pregnant woman to get some legal help with the ticket. She could even represent herself if it’s a local matter. (Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV.) Often you just need to show up, plead guilty with an explanation, and throw yourself on the mercy of the court to get a reduced fine or points or both.

    I used to get tickets fairly regularly, but I’ve been fortunate about it for the past 10 years or so. Better yet, a few years back, I found out my AAA membership included reimbursement for hiring a lawyer for traffic tickets, and I made good use of it. I’d guess the judge would be easy on her.

    For my last ticket, the DA agreed to dismiss it in exchange for a $100 contribution to the charity of my choice.

  10. Post
    Author

    I understand how you feel about those kinds of hassles, Barak. I’d tell the pregnant woman to get some legal help with the ticket. She could even represent herself if it’s a local matter. (Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV.) Often you just need to show up, plead guilty with an explanation, and throw yourself on the mercy of the court to get a reduced fine or points or both.

    I used to get tickets fairly regularly, but I’ve been fortunate about it for the past 10 years or so. Better yet, a few years back, I found out my AAA membership included reimbursement for hiring a lawyer for traffic tickets, and I made good use of it. I’d guess the judge would be easy on her.

    For my last ticket, the DA agreed to dismiss it in exchange for a $100 contribution to the charity of my choice.

Leave a Reply